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Full text of "Annual report of the Division of Immigration and Americanization"

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COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



Board of Higher Education 




Division of Immigration and Americanization 



FIFTY - SECOND 

ANNUAL REPORT 

July 1, 1968 • June 30, 1969 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
THE BOARD OF HIGHER EDUCATION 

in ii 1 1 ii ... . — . 

Winthrop S. Dakin, Chairaan 
AMHERST, wASS. 

Daniel C. Rich, Vice Chairaan 
WORCESTER, MASS. 



Dr. Gene P, Grillo 
H. Irving Grousbeek 
Mrs. Wil'liaa Spaulding 
wrs. Hyaan B. Ullian 
Louis m. Lyons 
Mrs. Sol W. Weltaan 
Roger L. Putna*», Sr. 
Robert W. Nelson 



- Bradford, Mass. 

- Weston, wa^s. 

- Wakefield, Mass. 

- Newton Centre, Mass, 

- Cambridge, Mass.. 

- Cambridge, Mass. 

- Petersham, Mass, 

- Attleboro, «ass. 



Dr. Richard m # Millard, Chancellor 
DIVISION OF IMMIGRATION AND AMERICANIZATION 

w»**ww^>— M^ ii i . i ium, m itiWi—w r i i ■■■ i ii — m il j i , —i *m*. 3».tw>— wwmwi— — mmrmtmem im ■■ mnn 

MAIN OFFICE 



BOSTON, MASS, 



Rooa 208, Tremont Building 
73 Tremont Street 
Telephone: 227-0718 
Supervisor of Social Service 
Teofilia K. Tat tan 



BRANCH OFFICES 



FALL RIVER, MASS. 



LAWRENCE, MASS. 



SPRINGFIELD, "ASS* 



WORCESTER, ^ASS. 



51 Franklin Street 
Telephone: OSborne 2-7762 
District Immigration Agent 
Daniel J. Donahue 

Room 308-9 Blakeley Building 
477 Essex Street 
Telephone: HJadock 2-2877 
District Immigration Agent 
Andrew W. Ansara 

State Office Building 
235 Chestnut Street 
Telephone: REpublic 4-1018 
District Immigration Agent 
John A. Mclnnes 

Roo« 401-402, Park Building 
507 Main Street 
Telephone: PLeasant 5-6815 
District Immigration Agent 
Edmund B. M e duski 



Publication #70 Approved by Alfred C. Holland - State Purchasing Agent 



.'".:, . ... v REPORT OF THE 

DIVISION OF li'U'ilGRATI ON AND AFRICANIZATION 

FOR THE YEAR " 
JULY 1, 1968 TO JUNE 30, 1969 

This year brings to a close fifty- two years of service the Division of 
Immigration and Americanization has been rendering in the Commonwealth in 
"bringing into sympethetic and mutually helpful relations the Commonwealth 
and its residents of foreign origin, and generally promoting their assimi- 
lation and naturalization." Established in 1917 as "the Bureau of immigration 
in 1919 it became the Division of immigration and Americanization as part of 
the Department of Education. 

From 1919 until 1965 the Division was under the Department of Education 
and since 1965 under the Board of Higher Education with the' 'enactment of 
Chapter 572. Its duties and functions havf remained the same through the 
years. 

Ore million six hundred fifty-seven thousand services have been given 
through our offices located in Boston, Fall River, Lawrence, Springfield, 
and Worcester. Our records indicate 16^981 services in 1920 with steady 
increases shown and the total for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1969 was 
47,112. Our largest amount of services recorded was in 1940 - 53,633 - the 
year of initiation of the Alien Registration Act. The work of the Division 
is intensified and varied with world situations and economics of war, de- 
pression and enactment of various immigration, citizenship and general social 
welfare laws. 

In a state which ranks seventh in number of aliens with 40% of the 
population of "foreign stock" as defined in the 1960 United States census 
reports (foreign born persons and those with foreign born parents) m u te 
testimony is denoted of the far-reaching and great demand for our services. 
In January 1969, 160,049 aliens registered in Massachusetts under the alien 
registration requirements of which 145,800 are permanent residents. The 
1968 registration recorded 149,654 of which 136,632 were permanent, an 
increase of over 9,000 permanent residents. 

NUMBER OF SER VICES 

■ i ' ■■■ !■■■ i » m ■ m 

Of the 47,112 services recorded in our statistics this year, the Boston 
Office shows 25,151; Fall River 4,674; Lawrence 7,262; Springfield 4,190; 
and Worcester 5,835. Of the total services, 9,743 concerned immigration 
matters, no doubt because of the immigration Act of 1965. Helping in re- 
union of families and giving information regarding labor clearances required 
now in so many cases were a great part of these services. 

NATIONALITIES OF CLIENTS 

Of the some one hundred eight countries of birth, as we recorded nation- 
alities of clients, services given to Italians were equal to those given 
Portuguese (including Cape Verde Island) - 4924 and 4921 respectively. The 
increase in the Portuguese was a result of the recent immigration law per- 
mitting reunion of families. There had been many Portuguese awaiting their 
turns. The Italians remain about the same because their quotas have been 
oversubscribed, especially in the fifth preference category (brothers and 
sisters), for many years. Next in number were Canada 3795; United States 



born 3721 (many United States born citizens make affidavits sponsoring their 
relatives from abroad, as they are usually first generation born Americans; 
and a number of U.S. born marry persons from abroad also) ; Cuba 3549. Al- 
though the new influx of Cubans is not as numerous as previously, we are now 
assisting the Cubans in becoming American citizens as well as in making 
papers to send for relatives from Spain, etc., via Mexico and through Jamaica, 
Other nationalities over one thousand. 



Greece 

Poland 

Jamaica 

Ireland 

Germany 



3,250 
2,162 
2,078 
1,273 
1,087, etc. 



ALIEBS IN MASSACHUSETTS 

i 

The Federal annual registration of aliens for January 1969 for the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts was recorded as 160,048 of which 145,800 are 
permanent residents; an increase of 13,000 over last year. 

STATES WITH OVER 100,000 ALIENS 



Massachusetts still ranks seventh in number of aliens 



California 

New York 

Illinois 

Texas 

Florida 

New Jersey . 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Pennsylvania 



1969 

944,149 

740,369 
239,705 
249,735 
267,360 
219,406 
160,048 
149,099 
107,303 



Permanent 
Resident 

871,585 

648,961 
212,023 
236,083 
192,872 
186,046 
145, 800 
135,722 
93,533 



Other Than 
Permanent Residents 

72 , 564 
91,408 
27,682 
13,652 
74,488 
33, 360 
14,248 
13,377 
13,770 



FRO*'* WHENCE THEY CO^E 

This year again in foreign speaking group, those from Portugal, re- 
corded as 27,758 formed the largest group, showing an increase of over five 
thousand from last year, attesting to the benefits of the immigration Act 

permitting reunion of families. Italians were next. See table of perma- 
nent resident aliens in Massachusetts, 



**A§§. 1969 ALIEN REGISTRATION OF PERMANENT RESIDENTS 



Total, 145,800 



Europe_ 



91,881 



Albania 


403 


Lithuania 


fiustria 


523 


Luxembourg 


Belgium 


265 


Netherlands 


Bulgaria 


42 


Norway 



1,944 

18 

1,162 

503 



Czechoslovakia 

Denmark 

Estonia 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Latvia 



137 

251 
33 
1,010 
1,381 
4,626 
5,686 

272 

5,250 

15,501 

602 



Poland 


7,327 


Portugal 


27,758 


Rumania 


128 


Spain 


308 


Sweden 


803 


Switzerland 


339 


Turkey 


501 


United Kingdom 


13,377 


U.S.S.R. 


1,450 


Yugoslavia 


224 


Other Europe 


57 



Asia 



7,025 



North America 



South America 



China 

India 

Indonesia .' 

Iran 

Iraq 

Israel 

Japan 

Jordan 

Korea. 

Lebanon 

Pakistan 

Palestine . 

Philippines 

Other Asia 



3,168 
573 

32 
172 

45 
458 
527 
143 
324 
558 

52 

12 
517 
444 



40,912 



Canada 33,450 

Mexico 285 

Barbados ,369 

Cuba 2,599 

Do*. Republic 465 

Haiti I \ ,491 

Jamaica 1,206 , 
Trinidad & Tob.. 553 

Costa Rica 393 

El Salvador 49 

Guatemala 256 

Honduras .501 

Nicaragua 30 

Panama 265 



3,363 



Argentina 

Brazil 

Chile"* 

Colombia 

Ecuador 

Peru 

Venezuela 

Other So* Am. 



649 
810 
104 
935 
268 
211 
202 
184 



Africa 519 



Morocco 


11 


South Africa 


174 


Tunisia 


14 


U.A. R. (Egypt) 


206 


Other Africa 


114 






Oceania - Total 456, Australia 362, New Zealand 89, Other Oceania 5. 
Stateless - Total 981, all others 663. 

IMMIGRATION PROBLEMS" 
Our greatest number of applicants come in matters of immigration in- 
formation on procedures; and various aspects of the laws were explained to 
9,743 such persons in our offices last year. 

The Act of October 3, 1965, with abolition of national origins quota 
systems and substitution of a world-wide system of preferences achieved its 
objective of wiping out barriers to family reunions (except for Italian 
brothers and sisters classified in fifth" "preference category) in Eastern 
Hemisphere where the total of 170,000 immigrants yearly with 20,000 as" ceil- 
ing for each country ruled. Those countries having benefited most from 
implementation of the Act of October 1965 are Italy, Portugal, Spain, and 
most of the southern European countries as well as the Philippines, China, 
Korea, Japan, and India. These were the countries heavily oversubscribed 
and most of which had the limitation of 100 numbers and, in" this transition 
interim period, they were able to take advantage of pool numbers and the 
20,000 per country limitation. 

The 1968 figures for immigrants destined to Massachusetts show the 
great number of Portuguese admitted to this State as a result of petitions 
made by relatives. The bulk of immigrants to Massachusetts are in this 
category reunited with their families by petitions in the preference 
category or on applications (Forms 1-550) to have evidence of legal resi- 
dence sent (as those in the Western Hemisphere) to American Consuls. 

Our many residents of Cape Verde origin, especially in New Bedford and 
Fall River, are concerned and their brothers and sisters as well'as friends 
in skilled categories are waiting now an indefinite period of time for 
visas. Spouses and children who are classified in second preference are 
more fortunate and last year we recorded '4,921 services performed for 
persons* of Portuguese ethnic background, mostly concerned with immigration 
problems. 

The bulk of immigrants in the past to our State were from Canada but 
with the ceiling of 120,000 immigrants yearly coming from the Western 
Hemisphere, there is a changing pattern. In 1965 before this law came into 
effect, to the United States were admitted 40,013 Canadians and Massachusett: 
received 4,114. In 1969, 15,722 Canadians came to the United States and 
Massachusetts received 2,015. There are twenty-four independent countries 
in the W e stern Hemisphere to draw on this quota; there are no preferences; 
and'the labor clearance restrictions have discouraged or prevented many 
from getting in line and waiting months, as is the present situation, for 
their turns in the quota. 



For *any it has been possible to change status in the United States. 
Students and graduates of colleges with necessary degrees or qualifying 
experience, eligible for preference categories, are among the 931 cases we 
assisted in our offices last year V 166 of whom our social workers repre- 
sented at hearings at the U.S. Immigration Service. 

A number of these were persons temporarily in the United States who 
married citizens'or legal alien residents, making it possible to adjust in 
this manner. Some, brothers and sisters of U. S. citizens, had come to the 
United States as tourists and then wanted to take the opportunity of resi- 
dence application. 

Many skilled workers, visitors here were able to qualify under sixth 
preference and availability of quota numbers permitted such applications. 

Several spouses under Exchange status were successful in obtaining 
necessary waivers and applied for adjustment under Section 245 of the 
Immigration and Nationality Act, as amended. 

In the past ten years, 135,858 immigrants were admitted to Massachusetts, 



1968 

1967 

1966 

1965 

1964 12,650 

1963 13,571 

1962 

1961 



19,339 

18,246 

15,120, 

11,455 

12,650 

13,571 

11,578 

12,091 



1960 11,953 

1959 9,855 

Aliens destined to Massachusetts - year ending June 30 5 1968 19,338 

Nationalities: 

Portugal 4,695 

Canada 2,015 



United Kingdom 


1,958 


Italy 


1,713 


Greece 


1,091 


Jamaica 


656 


Cuba 


642 


China 


481 


Germany 


462 


Trinidad and Tob. 


, 313 


Poland 


300 


Colombia 


182 


Haiti 


158 


Philippines 


141 


Dom. Republic 


77 


Spain 


69 


Yugoslavia 


49 


Mexico 


42 


All others 


4,305 






The 1968 report lists a few of the ^jorcitiesy in Massachusetts to which 
immigrants we re [admitted and , their, nationalities: 1 

BOSTON - Ail Countries ■ « ■'-;•■; - 4,137 

''■'■'"'' ' : " : -'v ■ ■■ Italy > <,;".\ .** F " 52B 

United Kingdom 410 

Cuba * 325 

. , ; '■ ,"■••'<• •'./ ; ,j , : .i , «w .. ; ■ Greece,. - v 267 

',•'.—•.'.■'•' ''" i' ; % : : - • ;• China/. ■ - ; '-' : '-2S7 - & 

V . . ■'' "-;''■•■ ;■ Canada' 224- •• ,, "■ £ , 

V* "' ■•• .'";■:■' Jamaica. 218 • .; & ... 
Trinidad & Togago ' 169 

Portuguese 90 

■ < J ;"" , f . ';'"') %;;'« : '. *j : :--;: Haiti v '88 

"■ :..., /' ■.■ Germany 74 

Philippines 61 

Colombia 47 . 

Poland 30 

Dominican Republic 20 

Mexico 14 

Spain 14 

Yugoslavia , 13 

All Others v -^- 1,345 ;< - 

CAi^BRIDGE -> All Countries ' ' 1,108 

"■ ■_ ' /'.,<> "',;• t *''■. Portugal : 255 

" f • '."'■■■. United Kingdom ' 137 

1 ., Italy 82 

Canada «■ 1 ' 55 

Greece 54 

' " China '"' •'" , V"\ 51 ' .-■ 

'■■' '■'. ;. *.. Germany 45 

Cuba 32 

■ ; : ; ■• 1 ' • Jamaica 10 

Trinidad & Tobago ll 

Haiti * t 10 

.Poland 7 

. i Philippines 7 

Colombia 6 

Dominican Republic 3 

,. ,'d Yugoslavia 3 

Mexico •# 2 

Spain 1 

1 All Others 828 
NEW BEDFORD - All Countries 1,346 

Portugal; 1»152 

Canada '* 15 

United Kingdom 14 

Poland .* 10 

V China 5 

Greece 4 

Philippines 3 

Spain 3 

Cuba . 2 

? v Jamaica 2 

. Germany 1 

Italy 1 

All Othors 134 



SPRINGFIELD - All Countries 



390 



WORCESTER - All 



Canada 


; 109 


Icaly 


83 


Jamaica 


38 


Greece 


28 


United Kingdom 


27 


Portugal 


11 


Poland 


8 


Germany 


7 


Trinidad 8 Togago 


6 


Cuba 


5 


Spain 


4 


Colombia 


2 


China 


1 


Haiti 


1 


Philippines 


1 


Mexico 


1 


All Others 


59 


countries 




Canada 


92 


Greece . 


88 


Italy 


53 


Poland 


34 


Jamaica 


22 


Colombia 


**17 


Germany 


13 


Cuba 


10 


China 


7 


Yugoslavia 


6 


■ Trinidad & Tobago 


5 


Philippines 


5 


Haiti 


4 


Mexico 


1 


Portugal 


1 


All Others 


143 


PROBLEMS OF THE 


NEWCOMER 



534 



To each family" 'arriving in Massachusetts fro«* abroad, a letter of 
weTcome is sent from our offices to make known the services offered by the 
Commonwealth to newcomers. Last year over ten thousand such letters were 
mailed from our five offices'. We note that about 10% of the letters are 
returned, undelivered, as the alien has left the original* address of 
destination, although the letters are sent within a few months of entry. 

Replies to our letters request information on educational opportuni- 
ties, housing, schools, employment changes, translation of documents to be 
used in evaluation of education, as well as questions on draft, citizenship 
and reunion With* 'families from abroad. Many write .us in their own* 
languages, predominantly Spanish as such numbers came recently from Spanish 
speaking countries of Latin America. 



During the past two years it has been estimated "that under the labor 
clearance requirements, seventy per cent of those admitted were live-in 
maids, Massachusetts having received its qjiota* Many donvesties in the 



Commonwealth, married and single," left families behind. After some months 
of working and "saving", they came to us for assistance in sending for their ( 
spouses and children. One such applicant from the West Indies had twelve 
children whom she was to have* 'join her, a few at a time. She was waiting 
for her year to be U p as a domestic, as she had promised; had rented an 
apartment in the same building as an aunt; and was planning work in a 
hospital so she could be home nights. She awaits now the arrival of the'two 
eldest, 15 and 14. At least the children and spouses of such legally admitted 
residents have priority of their mother's visa registration and the wait to 
come to the United States, if they show adequate support available, is not too 
long 

Some young ladies return to the West Indies on vacation and marry their 
fiances. After they are assisted in making the proper Form 1-550 to have 
the Consul notified of their legal residence in the United States, with 
affidavit of support, the long wait to have the spouse join her in the 
United States begins. Eight or nine months' wait has been usual lately 
and, in the meantime, the wife has often inquired in hopes of getting new 
information to expedite the husband's arrival* 

In instances where the legally resident aliens have married visitors 
from countries of the Western Hemisphere, we have been able to assist the 
spouses in getting visa applications at United States Consulates in Canada. 
The U.S. Immigration officials have been generous in extensions of time to 
keep the families together. 

Our statistics show that we filled" "844 Forms 1-550, required by the 
alien residents in sending for their families, particularly in the Western 

Hemisphere, 

VTSITORES FROM ABROAD 

i*iany friends and relatives of aliens in Massachusetts come from Spanish 
speaking countries of the Western Hemisphere as visitors. Many have approached 
us for information on becoming residents. Explanation has been given regard- 
ing labor clearances and showing experience, skills. This has proved an 
obstacle for young',* unskilled workers from Ecuador, Guatemala, Dominican 
Republic, etc., temporarily in the United States. 



We assisted in "filling 785 applications in their desire for an exten- 
sion of time. The majority of these are "granted but in certain" "cases it 
appears that the person wants to be an immigrant and no more time is given. 
Our workers* "have assisted persons in applications for job* clearances as well 
as helping many prospective employers "in execution of Forms ES-575, Part 
B, and the preference application forms 1-140 required for Europeans, etc. 

Since no adjustment in the United S*t*ates is possible for persons from 
the Western Hemisphere, the potential immigrant is greatly disappointed and 
hard to convince that he must return to his home in El Salvador, Guatemala, 
etc. , or Canada and wait many months for his turn in the quota in order to 
return t*6 the United States. The educated engineer as well as the skilled 
cabinet maker and the needed hospital work'er must all wait their turns 
abroad. Employe rs**have been dissuaded from filing applications for 
certification for many thousands of low-skilled workers because they knew 






the occupations were not certifiable. Employers have frequently raised 
the wages and working conditions they offered alien workers to the prevail- 
ing wages and working conditions required by the Department of Labor before 
an application can be approved,, & 

As visitors, such persons have the advantage of personal contact with 
prospective employers and can 'present their qualifications for the job 
opportunities. However, a number of unskilled young people have been unable 
to get jobs on the original list which the Department of Labor has deleted, 
as* 'hospital attendant, etc. "Prospects of gaining job' 'clearances are be- 
coming remote now when the employer realizes that he must wait months before' 
the employee will be available legally to work at the job offered, since he 
must go out and return from abroad. 

CUBANS 

Federal reports estimate four thousand Cubans monthly arrive at Florida 
from Havana, destined to various addresses. Cuban's continue coming to 
join relatives in Massachusetts, The bulk of the** in Massachusetts since 
1962, have become residents of the United States. Many in the past year we 
have assisted in filing applications for citizenship. The 1969 Alien 
Registration list 2,599 of them in Massachusetts but estimates by various 
groups show larger figures. 

It has been interesting to note changes in their places of residence 
fron» apartments in town and now many to suburbia as prosperity catches up 
with them. 

Last year we assisted 729 Cubans to fill necessary 'forms to become 
residents. ""In this area, applications filed for adjustment of status with 
the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service, Boston, have been stalled 
in that* Service for lack of personnel * 'to process the applications. A 
great many"of the applications filed months ago have had no hearings as yet. 
Western 'Hemisphere quota applications from this area are not, therefore, 
takgin many of the numbers of the 120,000 as other areas, as Florida, are 
doing where Cubans have been admitted faster. 

Many of the families continue making applications for their relatives 
to come via Mexico, Spain and Jamaica. With parents and minor children, it 
has not been too long a procedure but to comply with labor clearances for 
brothers and sisters has been a problem for relatives in the United States. 

The Department of State and the Immigration and Naturalization 
Service recently . agreed to extend the present pre -parole procedures of 
Cuban refugees who have fled to Spain, Mexico, and other countries to two 
additional categories. It is hoped that the new procedure will help 
alleviate the considerable waiting period'b'f Cuban refugees for visa numbers 
since institution of the 120,000 annual immigration ceiling on Western 
Hemisphere immigration. The new categories are: 



1. Unaccompanied Cuban boys and girls under 18 
years of age who are related by blood to grand- 
parents, aunts, uncles, or adult brothers or 
sisters in* "the United States who are citizens, 
lawful permanent residents, or are here in 
indefinite voluntary departure or parole status, 
provided such relatives in the United States 
are able to financially support such children. 

2. Cuban refugees, regardless of place of birth, 
who are parents, spouses, or children of aliens 
Lawfully admitted into the United states for 
permanent residence. 

No reTative in the United States receiving financial assistance from 
any governmental source will be considered eligible to sponsor entry into the 
United States of a refugee abroad. 

As to why Cuban refugees outside the United States neede certifications 
while those in the United States do not, it was pointed out "t*hat exemption 
of Cubans in the United States was based on the Labor Departments liberal 
interpretation of the law that. Cuban refugees in the United States were not 
entering; in order to take employment because they were already in the United 
States and therefore were not competing. Technically under the laws, Cubans 
coming to the United States from Spain, Mexico, Jamaica are not seeking asyluir 
and therefore tKe exemption from labor clearances granted refugees is not 
extended to them. 



CITIZENSHIP PROBLEMS 



The interests of the Nation "and of the Commonwealth are well served 
when the immigrant has become familiar with our social and political customs 
and ideals to be wel'l* informed, to seek naturalization, and to take active 
participation in community affairs* In addition to the requirement of five 
years* residence, the alien must be able to read and write English and have 
a knowledge of this country *s history, government, and Constitution. .. 

Many Massachusetts communities conduct programs in evening schools and 
through our letters to newcomers, we of£er information on these convenient 
classes. 

Oar booklet, "The Constitution of the United States" with questions 
and answers in preparation for citizenship, distributed yearly in the amount 
of ten thousand, assists many. 

During the year 1969, in this Commonwealth, 4,085 persons were admitted 
to'U.S. citizenship. Our offices assisted 1,572 in such applications. They 
comprised a* 'cross section of many countries and occupations, the elderly, the 
young, and more women than men. The following chart of numbers naturalized 
in the past ten years in Massachusetts is informative: 

1969 1968 1967 1966 1965 

4,085 4,105 4,596 4,304 4,652 

1964 1963 1962 1961 1960 

5,027 5,634 5,613 6,364 '5,146 



Breakdown of nationalities of persons naturalized in Massachusetts 
for the year ending June 30, 1968 is as follows: 

: " • '* '''-■ ««K*-bi*. "Canada '>'■■■■ 575 

Italy '•» 559 

Portugal 470 

> • United Kingdom 372 

Ireland .324 

Germany 285 

Greece 238 

' Poland 176 

Netherlands 87 

Cuba 75 , 

Hungary 66 
Denmark, Norway, Sweden 50 
China (includes Taiwan) 42 

Israel • 41 

Japan 3° 

Korea 30 

Philippines 18 

.. Yugoslavia ? ' , 8 

Mexico 6 

All others 692 

Incentive to become a citizen for a number Of Italian immigrants was their 
great desire to have their married children join them in the United States. 
Because of the Italian quota situation, they had been unable to join their 
parents here who Had come to the United States on an approved petition of a 
daughter who had married a U.S. citizen while he was abroad. Several wanted 
citizenship to be able to apply for public housing; a number to be able to 
practice their profession, as pharmacist, "doctor, nurse, or to get a license 
as'realtor. Declaration of Intention forms to the number of 107 were 
completed for persons who required them for job applications. 

Two hundred seventy-five deriving citizenship through their parents 
applied for certificates in their own names* "to prove their rights to 
United States citizenship. A number of th>en became aware of this necessity 
when they found it imperative to prove this fact in their desire to travel 
and get a U.S. passport. 

This year, with the passage of legislation permitting naturalization 
to persons having honorable service during the Vietnam hostilities, many 
Philippine navy men were allowed to be naturalized and we assisted them in 
filing applications. Public Law 90-369 was enacted as a result of admittance 
to citizenship in Massachusetts of the widow of a Vietnam veteran killed 
in service while her petition was pending. This law, approved' 'June 30, 1968 
by the President, provides that the death of a citizen serviceman during the 
period of honorable service in the armed forces does not preclude the alien 
spouse 's naturalization and exempts her from the naturalization requirement 
of residence and physical presence in the United States. 

Many bills for change in naturalization laws were introduced in Congress 
last year. Among these, hopefully awaited by many elderly "afraid 1 ' of the 
naturalization examination, is the proposed legislation to permit aliens 



over fifty years of "age, "having twenty years 1 residence, to become natural- 
ized, exempting them from the requirements of speaking, reading and writing 
English. 

Other suggestions regarding age of eligibility to derivative citizen- 
ship through one parent and changing legal presence in the United States 
to age 18 i ns tead of 16, as now required, are under consideration. 

Co-operation continues with many private and public social agencies 
to our mutual benefits. Assistance of and relationship with officials of 
the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service have been most valuable 
and beneficial . Leaders of several ethnic groups have "called for assistance 
for information on immigration laws, and for encouragement to members in 
becoming naturalized. Our agents have taken part in radio talks on the 
work of this Division. 

Massachusetts, a pioneer in <*any field, realizes it responsibility to 
foreign born here and and since the establishment or* this Division in 
1917, the directive to "bring into sympathetic and mutually helpful re- 
lations the Commonwealth and its residents of foreign origin" has been the 
aim of the Division with ever increasing services rendered yearly and is 
symbolic of assistance advocating'under standing of the principles and ideals 
of the United States government, making for a better Commonwealth and deeper 
respect for our Nation. 



REPORT OF BRANCH OFFICES 



SPRINGFIELD DISTRICT 



For the year ending June 30, 1*969, 4,190 services were performed for 
2,669 individuals* 'who sought information, advice and assistance from the 
Division, The complexity of applications and an ever increasing technicality 
of rulings have made our work highly technical. Therefore numbers served 
are not important in measuring the value of services. 

Individuals came to us from 54 communities* *in the area under our juris- 
diction. In addition we had correspondence from 43 former residents now liv- 
ing elsewhere in this country. 

Of the 84 nationalities recorded*/ Canadians head the list followed in 
order by natives of United States, Jamaica, Greece, Germany, Ibrtugal, Great 
Britain, Ireland and Barbados. 

During the year 546 contact were made* with newly arrived immigrants 
welcoming them and advising tKera of the" 'numerous services available to them by 
our Commonwealth. Of this number 81 came to reside in Berkshire County, 2*1 
in Franklin, 389 in Hampden and 55 in Hampshire. Response from them was most 
encouraging as well as gratifying. Without exception they expressed their 
thanks for the interest shown in offering assistance to adjust to their new 

way of life. 

- • - * 

As has been the case for many years, the major potption of our work comes 
under the heading of Immigration such as explaining the laws and procedures 
for sponsoring relatives and assisting with the preparation of forms of 
petitions, affidavits of support and "applications for adjustment. We were 
instrumental in arranging with the American Consul at St. John, New Brunswick, 
Canada, for issuance of immigrant Visas to 15 persons. These individuals were 
natives of countries in the Western Hemisphere who had entered the United States 
on a temporary basis. All these cases were rather" involved, representing many 
services performed for each individual as well as many hours of labor before 
each case was brought to a conclusion. 

One of our cases, most interesting as well as urgent, concerned a recently 
naturalized citizen, a former native of a European country, who was interested 
in bringing her retarded child to the United States. Within a few days of her 
naturalization, she approached us with the following problem*:**' She related to 
us that she was planning to leave the United States in the immediate future 
to visit in her country of birth and while there hoped to make the necessary 
arrangements to attempt to bring her ten year old son with her upon her return 
to the United States. She explained, that she had but two Weeks to be abroad 
and that would be during the period that her husband was on vacation and able 
to care for their other children. Then, too, "she stated that she had to 
return to the United States within the above-mentioned period as she had a 
thirteen year old daughter w to was to undergo open heart surgery at Boston. We 
are happy to report that we were able to advise and assist her so that she 
realized her goal and the child is now residing with her. 



Another case worth noting is that referred to us by a member of our 
Legislature which involved a native of Canada admitted to the United States 
as a visitor. Subsequent* to her arrival she was married to a native born 
citizen. Prior to her coming to the United States both she and her fiance 
had approached an American Consulate in Canada and obtained the* necessary 
advice on how-to get an immigrant visa. After interviewing them, we found 
that several months had elapsed and they had failed to comply with any of 
the instructions given them by the Consul. After we took over her case, 
she received an appointment within two weeks to appear at the appropriate 
Consular office. 

Another interesting case concerned a native of Czechoslovakia who 
managed to flee that country after the occupation.* She entered the United 
States as a visitor and immediately sought adjustment of her status to that 
of a permanent resident. 

This year we had an unusual number of people apply for Alien Regis- 
tration Receipt Cards stating that the original 1-151 has been stolen 
either from their pocketbooks and wallets, or as a result of their automo- 
biles being broken into. 

We were called upon to advise and assist several adults in obtaining 
Certificates of Citizenship, as proof of United States citizenship was re- 
quired before a U. S. Passport could'~be issued. In each instance, reser- 
vations for transportation had been made and each individaul had waited 
until the last moment to apply for a passport. 

Again trhis year we corresponded with both the* United States Department 
of State, Washington, D. C and the United States Immigration and Naturaliza- 
tion Service to obtain adjudication of citizenship status of native born 
citizens who while living abroad had lost citizenship either by voting or 
military service. 

The District Agent attended final naturalization hearings at Spring- 
field and was pleased to witness as well as to congratulate those success- 
ful candidates for citizenship whose' "applications originated in our office. 
He also attended with other staff members an Immigration Conference and 
Workshop sponsored by the International Institute of Boston at which ranking 
officials of the United States Department of Labor briefed us on recent* 
changes in rules and regulations pertaining to issuing of immigrant visas. 

We wish to emphasize that we continue to enjoy splendid cooperation 
with the following: District jjirector, Immigration and Naturalization 
Service, Boston, and their staff at Springfield; United States Department 
of State; United States Consulates; Clerks of Superior Courts in our area. 

In addition we receive splendid cooperation from both public and 
private agencies in our area. 



WORCESTER DISTRICT 



Again we attained our substantial annual par of services, numbering 
5835 for 3384 clients. 



Even though I don't agree with him," to point out the complex nature of 
our work, I would like to quote a statement by a well known Immigration 
expert whose article has been printed in the Interpreter Releases, an 
official information service on immigration, naturalization and related 
problems: '""The immigration statutes of the United States are among the worst, 
longest, most ambiguous, complicated, illogical, undemocratic and arbitrary 
laws" in the world." * Daily, we have to explain these" laws and try to clarify 
them to persons in all walks of life, citizens, permanent resident aliens, 
refugees, parolees, and visitors, who are interested in their own particular 
case and not the over all picture," at the same time selecting and assisting 
them with" "the correct form or forms to handle their particular case. But, 
only an immigration worker ©.an fully comprehend the human and technical 
situations that we encounter. 

Except for Italy, Public Law 89-236 solved the close relative problem 
for the Eastern Hemisphere, but U.S. citizens having brothers and sisters 
born in Canada or other Western Hemisphere countries are annoyed over the 
fact that they cannot petition for them, as from other sections of the world. 

This year, as the past few we spent a considerable length of time explai 
ing and giving out a myriad number of ES- 5 75, Employment Certification Forms, 
i"n carder that extremely needed professional, skilled and unskilled workers 
might emigrate to this state and country. Except for Exchange Visitors, 
many students graduating in a professional field from colleges in the 
Worcester area have been able to remain without leaving the United States. 
Skilled and semi-skilled persons from the Caribbean area have qualified, 
while previously they had difficulty under other procedures. 

Travelers to the Worcester area from all over the world have increased 
due to a more lenient policy by the U.S. Department" of State in issuing such 
tourist visas, and residents are traveling abroad more than ever. Visitors 
come into our office* for applications for extension of stay and with 
questions about permanent visas or change of status. In fact, the stickers 

seen on cars stating "International Visitor, Seeing the U.S.A. Kindly 
Extend All Courtesies," reiterate the policy of our Division. The City 
Passport office has issued about 1,200 more U.S. Passports during a six 
month period compared to five years ago that is, 2,854 compared to 1,594. 
Needless to say, many vacationers and business people, especially the ones ^ 
going" to visit Canada, call us about the necessary identification and 
documentation. 

As expected, more visitors mean more adjustment of status cases. In one 
family the fifth member became a permanent resident through this fairly 
lengthy procedure. The family's case history started in July 1955 when" one 
of them remained after marrying a citizen, later becoming a citizen himself 
and helping out the others with affidavits of support and petitions. His 
sister has forty-one sheets in her case folder, that is, copies of necessary 
forms and correspondence with the Immigration Service and the U.S. Consulate, 
Montreal, Canada. 

As far as we know, we had the distinction of having the only case in -:>• 
this district of a wo»an visitor from the U.S.S.R., applying for adjustment 
of status and remaining here. 



The Worcester area comprises persons of all ethnic backgrounds and 
the problems of the foreign born in reunion with their families and 
assimilation in their new homes are many." The gratitude of our clients as 
well as knowing "good Americans" in the making are incentives for continu- 
ation of assistance in complex problems. 



♦ 



LAWRENCE DISTRICT 

The Lawrence District office completed the fiscal year ending June 30, 
1969, with a record number of services rendered clients. Furthermore, in 
its some fifty years of existence, the Lawrence office served more people in 
this past fiscal year than in any other single year. Our services were 
7,262 to 3,021 individuals. 

As in the past years, information pertaining to immigration was the 
service most frequently given. The restrictive regulations of the U.S. 
Department of Labor, especially toward natives of the Western Hemisphere, 
are continuing to plague our Canadian and Latin clients. Separated families 
cannot be reunited as it is easier for an employer to bring a maid from 
Europe than for an American citizen to bring a brother from Canada. The 
excessive waiting period a prospective employee from a Western Hemisphere 
country must undergo before being allowed entry into the United States to 
go to work for an employer is discouraging. 

For example, a textile manufacturer found it impossible to find "compe- 
tent loomfixears in the United states and expected papers for five loomfixers 
from Canada. He had one hundred looms in the weaving room and five? loom- 
fixers. A loomfixer can adequately care for ten looms. Because of the no 
preference category in the quota for Western Hemisphere, these persons on the 
waiting list must now wait some eleven months for their turn to come to the 
United States and fifty loofts ^ust regain idle for one year. Weavers, bobbin 
hands, and sweepers are laid off for lack of work. The manufacturer can 
guarantee only half of the orders he has received. This is just one isolated 
instance know to the Lawrence office. We feel sure the sa^e situation is 
being repeated throughout the country. There seemingly are inequities for 
persons coming from the Western Hemisphere. 

In our citizenship work, it has* been a source of satisfaction to us to 
realize that this office was instrumental in assisting over 95% of the 
foreign born in the Merrimack Valley in their efforts to become American 
citizens. This Agent attended all naturalization sessions held in Lowell and 
Lawrence. 

In the field of public relations, this Agent instituted a series of 
sessions with employers and foreign visitors, explaining the procedures 
involved in applying for labor certifications, visa petitions, and changes 
of status. At one session in Lowell, there were over 100 in attendance. 

Other services rendered included the sending of letters of welcome to all 
newcomers in this area, We have made innumerable translations of documents 
from Arabic, French, German, Italian, Spanish and Latin, both for this office 
and for other offices of the Division. Individuals coming to this office with 
problems other than immigration or citizenship have been referred to proper 
sources usually preceded by a telephone call or letter of reference. Our 



relations with various private and public agencies, as well as with Consular 
offices abroad, are continuing on a most favorable plane. 

Whenever we submit request for publicity to the Lowell and Lawrence 
radio stations and newspapers, their responses ahve been most agreeable. 

In the past few years the requests to this office for service have 
increased tremendously. We have been fortunate in obtaining the aid of one 
and sometimes two young ladies from the Neighborhood Youth Corps for clerical 
work at no cost to the Commonwealth. This has worked out mutually beneficial 
as training to the volunteer and releasing our clerical overload. Our 
services have solved and are continuing to solve the problems of individuals 
who really have no other place to turn. 

FALL RIVER DISTRICT 

During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1969, the Fall River office 
rendered a total of 4,674 services to clients. This is an increase of 503 
services over the previous year. A total of 2,648 individuals received our 
services, an increase of 239, for the' past fiscal year. These clients came 
from 43 separate localities of the Commonwealth and the bulk of these client s 
were from the area of Southeastern Massachusetts. 

We note that "ore services this year were given regarding U.S. citizen- 
ship than last year. Applications to be naturalized showed an increase - more 
citizens petitioned to have their children be naturalized because of the one 
parent's citizenship - also more persons applied to get proof of U.S. citizen- 
ship in application for Certificate of Derivative Citizenship. 

Immigration problems in this area always predominate because of the 
large Portuguese Nationality group here and under recent legislation it has 
been possible for families and relatives to be united. We assisted more 
persons in filing visa petitions to gain preference, there was an increase 
of visitors to the United States whom we helped in application for extensions 
of temporary stay, we also aided more persons in change of status cases to 
become permanent residents in the United States. 

There has been a large influx of new immigrants located in Southeastern 
Massachusetts emigrating from the Azores and Cape Verde Islands, Portugal. 
The Portuguese ethnic groups are at present the predominating nationality in 
this district. 

During the past fiscal year, there has been a grassroot influx, namely 
immigrants from the Philippines and South America. There have been thousands 
of servicemen from the Philippines who did not have legal permanent residence 
in the United States and were not entitled to United States citizenship. Dur- 
ing the past session of Congress an Act was passed providing that the service- 
man enlisted or reenlisted after February 28, 1961 is now eligible for 
immediate naturalization. Numerous Philippines nationals have taken ad- 
vantage of this and all forms and documentation were completed at the Fall 
River Office for many. 



Newcomer letters are sent to individuals upon their arrival in the 
United States informing them of the whereabouts of this office and also of 
our immigration and citizenship services. Response from these letters and 
expressions of gratitude are most gratifying. 

New immigration quotas have opened the door for thousands of aliens 
who for years were waiting their turn to enter the United States. Many are 
now in the United States and many more are in the process of coming. This 
Fall River office served clients from fifty nations and, as we stated before, 
the major ethnic nationality is Portuguese. 

We have made weekly visits to New Bedford, Massachusetts, for assistance 
in applicants there. The Case load is heavy due to the fact that there has 
been no State Immigration office since 1939, nor a Federal immigration Service 
since 1953. Our attendance at Court for final naturalization lends precedence 
to the functions of the Agency. We have had excellent coopeaation throughout 
the. year in our relations with American Consuls, > State Department, Federal 
Immigration and Naturalization Service, and other public and private agencies. 

It is evident that the Commonwealth of Massachusetts can look with 
pride at its statewide progra m of sympathetic and mutually helpful assistance 
to its citizens and residents of foreign origin. 



Eh 

CO 



STATISTil&I, DETAIL 



Servicer Given 



FISCAL YEAR 7/L/68 - 6/30/69 



INFORMATION^ 
Citizenship 



5559 



Booklets, Forms, Blanks 

Immigratio n 

Travel 

Other • ' 



199 



H2BB" 

Z2E 

117 



FORMS FILLED 



Change of Address (AR-11) 
Con, Biographic Form (DSpv^cT 



536U 



IBS" 
131 



Visa Registration (ES-U97 & &) 121 
Imm., Visa Amplication (FS-510) ~"91 
Representative Reg, (G-28) '"'226 
Alien Registration (1-53) jfiio 

Dup. Alien Reg. Caret (l-90]~ ~27l 



Visa Pet-Temp.. Help (1-129)' 
Relative Petition 1-130) 
Reentry Permit (1-131) ; 
Skilled. Labor Petition (I-lliO) §5 



"TooBT 



225" 



Re; Unrelinquished Dom. (1-191)"" 3 



Per, to reenter after Dep. ( 1-212 )l " 
Removal to Native Cotintry(I>2l|3 ? 1* 
Suspension of Dep, (I-256A) 2 

Appeal (I-290B)_ 6 " 

Foreign Police Clearance (i-Wl*) 58" 
Reg, for Citizenship (l-l;85) IP 

Temp. Change of Status (1-506) 29 ' 
Ext, Visitor Stay (I-J&9) 39 6 



Ver, of Legal Entry (1-5^ 6) Ty$ 
Pet. Under Orphan Act.(l-6COj~ 
Waiver of Excludability ( 1-6 Olj 
Exch, Student Waiver (I-612J" 

Other Immigration Forms 

Declaration Of Int. (N-300j 

Pet, for Naturalization (N-liOO) ■ 85l 

Repatriation (N-UOl) ' % 4 "~*2 

Pet, for Nat'l Child (N-l*02}_ ^2 



Verification Mil. Service (N- U26)6Q" 
Duplicate Certificate (N-565) *" 73' 
Cit. Verification Rbroad(N-577 V_ - 
Info, from Records, (N-585 *~oT 



Deriv, Cert. Application (N-6 80)135" 
Other Naturalization Forms 20 



PAGE TOTAL 



10923 



fa PE* 



191*2 

"""SoT 



15 



901 



iu 



TH" 



197 



37 



T3T 



"2F 




22T 



93 



22 



1ST 



TW 



281^3 



3078 




177 



a_73 



161 

"98" 



1697 



76 



32 



fa 
o 

ft 

fa 

CO 



OFFIC 



2506 



792 



305 



1133 



219 



57 



7U7 



32 



T3T 



37 



TW 



"W 



IS? 



50 



39 



5 



70 



^2 



90 

w 



10 



T 



TEcT 



123 



TZ 



8 



THT 



T 



10 



17 



13 



10 



1*775 



63 

w 



TB" 



132 



I 

T 



"2T 



¥ 



60 

T 



H 

CO 
fa 

a 
s 



- ALL OIFICES 



3385 



539 



TS2ir 

"T9ir 



907 



35 



3 



31 



252 

"35" 



"T5T 



22 



3253 



7 



TB" 



1 
T 



20 
TUB" 



11 



13 



32. 



s 



16U70 



2%B" 



21*17 



"97ET 



1058 
"~2BIT 



9616 

"T9-H— 



171 

157 



TUT 



1*292 >6o86 



"35F 



1693 
T73T 



T5E2 



311 

T2F 



1 



5 



7T 



IF 



51 

T8F 



"Hinr 



9 

"o" 



7 

"B5" 



107 

Ego 



IS" 



"ET" 



66 



137 



1 

Tic7 



275 



W 



EXECUTION OF AFFIDAVITS 
Affidavit of Support 
Affidavit of Facts 



Certificate of Identity 

TJ.S.S.R. Exit Permit 

Polish Assurance 

Other Notarial 



Cuban Adjustment (I-U05A) 
Biographic Inf. (G325 

(G32$A) 
Labor Clearance (ES-575a"~ 

'.and B 



OTHER SERVICES 



Change of Status 
Appearance at Hearings^ 
Interpretation & TransT 

Letters __^__ *^____«_ 
Other 



NEWCOMER INTERVIEW 



Page Total 
First Page Total 

GRAND TOTAL 



EH 



1*863 



m 
ft 

04 



P«4 



W 



^ 



a3i 



13 



15 



60 
190 



"727 



12U0 



183 



1*83 



iiT 



258 



887 



309 



109 



p-« 
co 



232 



109 



13 



90 



99 



205 



757U 



602 



T2EF 

T57TT 



661* 
"9?" 



TIT 



53 



PCS 

CO 
W 
O 



691 



EH 

O 
E-« 



^oT 



7156 



2912 
135" 



T 



97 



17 



litU7 
- 7B- 



2_- 



1791 



ll»228 
10923 



68U 



1^2" 



1111 



106 



2 

101 

"IS" 



27 



133 
W 

*92lf 



169 



1889 



239 



335 
~oT 



-26T 



610 



10630 



93. 



TI5" 



931 
ToT 



153 



1831 
281*3 



2$L$L 



1*671* 



21*87 
1*775 



370 



397 



153X 



HI 



2l±2 



321*0 



7262 



937 
3253 



1*190 



151*3 
1*292 



21026 
26086 



5835 



1*7112 



TOTAL 




Albania 

Algeri 

Antiqua 

Arabia 

Argentina t 

Armenia (R or T) 

Australia 

Aruba 

Austria 

Bahamas 

Barbados 

Belgium 

Bermuda 

Boliva 

Brazil 

Br. Guiana 

Bulgaria 

Canada 

Ceylon 

Chile ' 

China_ 

Colombia 

Congo 

Casta Rica 

Cuba 

Cyprus 

C z echo Slovakia 

Danzig 

Denmark_ 

Dom. Republic 

Ecuador 

Egypt 

El Salvado: 

England 

Estonia 

Finland 

Formosa 

France 

Germany 

Ghana 

Greece 

Guatemala 

Haiti 

Honduras 

Hong Kong 

Hungary 

Iceland 

India 

Indonesia 

Iran 

Iraq 

Ireland 

Israel 

Italy 



55. 
56. 
57. 
58. 
59. 
60. 
61. 
62. 

63. 
61*. 

65. 
66. 

67. 
68. 
69. 
70. 
71. 
72. 
73. 
7fc 
75. 
76. 

77. 
78. 
79. 
80. 

81. 
82. 
83. 
8U. 
85. 
86. 

87. 
88. 

89. 
90. 
91. 
92. 
93. 
9k. 
9$* 
96. 

97. 
98. 

99. 
100. 
101. 
102. 
103. 
10U. 
105. 
106. 

107. 
108. 



Jamaica 


1 
BOSTON 

i 

i 

! 

tLl4l9 


FALL 
RIVER 

i 
21 


I LAURENCE 

■ ! 

1 

i 

i 5 


; SPRING- 
■ EIELD 

| U99 


! WORCESTER 

t 

i 13U 


TLTAL 
2078 


Japan 


i 76 


; 8 


I 12 


71 


! 18 


185 


Jdrdan 


hS 




1 17 


10 


! h 


76 


Kenya 


1 1 


- 


! 


1 


6 


7 


Korea 


l -W 


15 


30 


"T9" 


1 31 


203 


Latvia 


89 


5 


2 


2 


— 


98 


Lebanon 


110 


19 


387 


U6 


77 


639 


Liberia 


18 


- 


- 


3 


1 


22 


Libya 


IT 


- 




- 


- 


k 


Lithuania. 


185 


- 


50 


1 


92 


328 


Macau 


1 


.. -. 


- 


— 


- 


1 


Malaya 


1 3 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


Malta 


- 


— 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Manchuria 


- 


- 


— 


— 


— 


- 


Mexico 


127 


h 


25 


13 


20 


189 


Monaco 


20 


- 


- 


- 


- 


20 


Montserrat 


238 


- 


- 


- 


- 


238 


Morocco 


7 


i 


23 


15 


1 


1*6 


Netherlands 


71 


! 3 


12 


13 


Til 


1U0 . 


New Zealand 


a 




3 


8 


1 


16 


Nicaragua 


35 


— 


- 


2 


- 


37 


Norway 


29 


Uh 


3 


- 


13 


159 


Other Countries 


82 


- 


- 


18 


- 


100 


Pakistan 


7 


- 


2 


- 


1 


10 


Palestine 


3U 


- 


36 


2 


- 


72 


Panama 


227 


1 


2 


U8 


5 


283 


Paraguay 


13 


- 


- 


8 


- 


21 


Peru 


185 


- 


7 


6 


11 


209 


Philippines 


385" 


126 


18 


10. 


56 


626 


Poland 


10G3 


115 


2U3 


216 


525 


2162 


Portugal 


1150 


3258 


ULb 


62 


35 


U921 


Puerto Rico 


U6 


- 


7 


9 


7 


69 


Rumania 


61 ~ 


- 


11 


7 


28 


107 


Saudi Arabia 


- 


- 


— 


- 


- 


- 


Scotland 


109 


6 


66 


16 


iai 


332 


South Africa 


15" " 


- 


25 


— 


- 


__i£— 


Spain 


118 


3 


23 


20 


30 


19U 


St. Lucia 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


- 


Sudan 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Sweden 


13 


1 


2 


9 


3\x 


59 


Switzerland 


71 


2 


k 




9 


B6 _ 


Syria 


S3 


1 


61 


1 


26 


il;2 


Thailand 


22 




1 


10 


4* 


37 


Trinidad 


898 


- 


5 


33 


h 


9hO 


Turkey 


212 


10 


30 


25 


73 


350 


Ukraine 


18 


, 2 


1 


« 


7 




U.S.S.R. 


220 


2 " 


31 


U> 


hi 


"" 3k6 


United States 


1881± 


383 


202 


529 


729 


3727 


Uruguay 


k2 


- 


1 


■a 


72 




Venezuela 


25 


— 


17 


h 


11 


Vietnam 


23 


2 


11 


m 


5--1 


111 _ 


Wales 


5 


2 


8 


1 


7 


23 


¥. Indie J 


131 


3 


3 : 


12 


1- 


150 


Yugoslavia 


122 


1 


30 


2~~ 


39 


195 


Tptal 


25151 


167U 


7262 


ljl90 


5835 


U7H2 



TOTAL 




Fiscal Year 7/1/68 - 



Abington 

Acton 

Acushnet 

Adams 

Agawam 

Alford 

Amesbury 

Amherst 

Andover 

Arlington 

Ashburnham 

Ashfield 

Ashland 

Athol 

Attleboro 
Auburn 
Avon 
Ayer 

Barnstable 

Barre 
Bedford 



Bel chert own 

Bellingham 

Belmont 

Berkley 

Beverly^_ 

Billerica 

Blacks tone 

Bolton 

Boston 

Bourne 

Boxford_ 

Boylston 

Braintree 

Brewster 

Bridgewater 

Brimfield 

Brockton 

Brookfield 

Brookline 

Burlington 

Cambridge 
Canton 
Carlisle 
^arver 
Charlton 
Chelmsford 
Chelsea 



Cheshire 


BOSTON 
1 


FALL 
RIVER 


1 
LAURENCE 


SPRING- 
FIELD 


WORCESTER 


TOTAL 
1 


Chester 


- 


- 


- 


9 


- 


9 


Chicoope 


2 


- 


- 


U38 


1 i 


m 


Clinton 


6 


■* 


- 


- 


13U 


liid 


Cohasset 


1 


- i 


- 


- 


i 


Concord 


25 


- 


- 


- 


25 


Danvers 


5 




h 




mm 


9 


Dartmouth 


1 


103 


- 


- 


- 


1 10U 


Dedham 


117 


- 


6 


- 


- 


123 


Deer field 


10 


- 


- 


2 


- 


12 


Dighton 


- 


13 


- 


- 


- 


13 


Dover 


8 


- 


- 


■M 


- 


8 


Dracut 


! i 


- 


131 


- 




1 "3? 




■LJC. 


Dudley 


- 


- 


- 


- 


128 


128 


Duxbury 


1 2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


E. Bridgewater 


1 

i i 


. 


mm 




mm 


1 


EJLongmeadow 


— 


- 


- 


53 


6 


69 


Easthampton 


17 


- 


- 


26 


- 


U3 


Eaton 


8 


i 


- 


- 


- 


13 


Egremont 


- ' h 


- 


- 


2 


- 


6 


Essex 


10 


«• 


- 


- 


- 


10 


Everett 


355 


- 


- 


- 


- 


355 


Fairhaven 


2 


130 




. 


mm 


132 


Fall River 


18 


2,U70 


- 




_ 


2 S U88 


Falmouth 


17 


39 


- 


- 


- 


56 


Fitchfcurg 


32 




18 


- 


65 


115 


Foxboro 


16 


2 


— 


- 


- 


18 


Framingham 


200 


— 


7 


— 


U 


211 


Franklin 


36 


— 


- 


- 


- 


36 


Freetown 


_ 


1 


MB 


- 


- 


1 


Gardner 


6 


*" 






62 


68 


Gloucester 


211 


- 


3U 


- 


- 


2hS 


Grafton 


1 




- 


- 


108 


~\ no 




- 1 - 


xuy 


Grants 


- 


— 


12 


- 


12 


Great Barrington 


1 


- 


- 


3 


- 


k 


Greenfield 


7 




- 


8 


- 


15 


Groton 


3 


- 


1 


- 




h 


Grovel and 


2 


_ 


JL 


- 


- 


3 


Hadley 


wm 


■N 


3 


5 


. 


8 


Halifax 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Hamilton 


11 


- 


am 


- 


- 


11 


Hampden 


- 


- 


- 


19 


- 


19 


Hancock 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Hanover 


~U 


- 


- 


- 


- 


h 


Hanson 


' h 


9 


- 


- 


— 


13 


Hardwick 


- 


- 


- 


- 


7 


' - ' r 


Harvard 


2 


- 


- 


- 


— 


2 


Harwich 


6 


- 


- 


- 


- 


6 


Hatfield 


3 


- 


- 


6 


m 


9 



















1 

Haverhill 


BOSTON 
1U 


FALL 
RIVER 


ck'JRENCE 
326 




SPRING- 
FTFJF-.B 


WORCESTER 


TOTAL 
3U0 


Hingham 


73 


- 


MM 


- 


- 


73 


Hinsdale 


- 


- 




6 


_ 


6 


Holbrook 


10 


- 


- 


- 


• _. 


10 


Holden 


5 


- 


2 


- 


120 


127 


Holliston 


13 


- 


- 


i 


- 


13 


Holyoke 


13 


- 


- 


210 7 


230 


Hopkinton 


2 i 


- 


- 1 


2 


Hudson 


III 


- 


- 


- 


UB 


89 


Hull 


29 


- 


- 


- 


- 


29 


Ipswich 


3k 




mm 




mm 


3U 


Kingston 


15 


— 








15 


mm 


~ 


*■ 


Lancaster 


— 


mm 


um 






179 


179 


— 


Lawrence 


26 


- 


3535 


- 


- 


3,561 


Lee 


- 


- 


- 


-4t 


- 


h 


Leicester 


- 


- 


- 


- 


6U 


6h 


Leominster 


15 










65 


do 


■* 


Leverett 


- 


- 


- 


l 




1 


™* 


j. 


Lexington 


96 


MS 


h 


- 




1 DO 


■■ 


-LUvJ 


Lincoln 


3h I 


- 


— 


■■ 


34 


Littleton 


H 


■- 7 


- 


- 


18 


Longmeadow 


i 


- 


■- 


119 


- 


110 


T.ht-taT " 


56 


a 


1793 






1,853 




MB 




Ludlow 


- 


- 


M» 


87 


- 


67 


Lunenburg - 


- 


- 


" 1 


'" "" )i 


h 


4 


4 


Lynn 


1*23 


- 


3 1 




)»oA 


MB 


UcO 


Lynnfield 


3 


- 


r 


- 


3 




182 


1 


n 








Maiden 




— 


- 


184 


2 




Manchester 


18 " 


— 


It 


- 


5 


27 


Mansfield 


7 


— 








7 


MS 


Marblehead 


30 


8 


_ 


- j 38 


Marion 


- 1 5 


- 


- 


- 


5 


Marlborough 


3h 




_ 


66 


100 


Marshfield 


2T 


— 


mmmmm t 




2T 


Mashpee 


10 


- 






10 


Mattapoisett 


- 


8 


- 


- 


- 


8 


Maynard 


39 


- 


8 


- 


- 


hi 


Mayfield 


hi 


- 


- 


_ 


- 


hi 


Medford 


205 


— 


B 


- 


- 


205 


Medway 


b 


— 


- 


- 


- 


8 


Melrose 


98 


~ 


- 


- 


- 


"98 


Mendon 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


3 


Merrimac 


- 




25 


- 


- 


25 


Methuen 


6 


- 


383 


- 


- 


389 


Middleborough 


5 


1 


- 


- 


- 


6 


Milford 


20 


- 




- 


136 


156 


mm 


Miilbury 






- 


- 


69 


69 


mm 


m 


Millis 


9 


- 


- 


- 


- 


9 


Milton 


6 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 L 

J 20 


Honson 


- 


- 


- 


■ 20 


• - 



















Montague 


BOSTON 


FALL 

RIVER 


LAWRENCE 

i 


•SPRING- 
FIELD 

l 

1 


WORCESTER 

i 

! 

i 

i — 


TOTAL 
1 


Nahant 


h 


i 


i 


| 


i 


h 


Nantucket 


7 


- 


- 




i 


7 


Natick 


67 


- 


- 


i 


1 


68 


Needham 


5b 


- 


i 


1 


! 


58 


New Bedford: 


12 


1327 


i ~ 


- 


| 


1,339 


Newbury 


- 


1 


1 2 


- 




2 


Newburyport 


5 


i 


! lil 


- 


• *~ 


U6 


Newton 


610 


i " 


! 23 


'mm 




633 


Norfolk 


i h 


- 




- 


- 


h 


North Adams 


i ~ 


- 


19 


- 


19 


N« Andover 


1 


- 


71 


- 


mm 


72 


N.Attleborough 


i 


3 


- 


M 


- 


3 


N.Brookfield 


- 


- 


- 


- 


12 


12 


N.Reading 


8 


- 


1 


- 


- 


9 


Northampton 


3 


- 


w 


- 


U3 


Northborough 


1 




- 


- 


80 


81 


Northbridge 


- 


- 


- 


- 


23 


23 


Northfield 


- 


- 


- 


8 


- 


b 


Norton 


6 


6 


- 


- 


- 


12 


Norwell 


17 


■■ 


- 


m 


- 


17 


Norwood 


88 


n 


3 


mm 


- 


102 


Oakham 


; 


. 


. 


_ 


h 


h 


Orange 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


Otis 


- 


- 


™"™ 


1 


- 


1 


Oxfotd 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5b 


58 


Palmer 


5 






23 




28 •• 


Pax ton 




- 


- 


- 


2h 


2U 


Peabody 


27U 


- 


Ill 


- 


- 


28b 


Pembroke 


23 


- 


- 


- 


- 


23 


Pepperell 


5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5 


Petersham 


- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


3 


Pittsfield 


55 


- 


- 


17 


- 


72 


Plainfield 


3 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


Plain© ille 


3 


6 


- 


- 


- 


9 


Plymouth 


11 


- 


— 


- 


- 


11 


Plymptcn 


o 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


c. 


Quincy 


279 


1 


2 


■M 


— 


282 


Randolph 


ill 


1 








U2 


Rayham 


3 


13 


- 


- 


- 


16 


Reading 


31 


- 


6 


- 


- 


37 


Rehoboth 


- 


2 


- 


- 


mm 


2 


Revere 


167 


- 


- 


- 


- 


187 


Rochester 


17 


h 


- 


/""" 


- 


21 


T?ook"T stiH 


38 


3 


- 


- 




Jil 




"* 


*-M- 


Rockport 


15 


- 


- 


- 


- 


15 


Rcwley 


h 


— 


•a 


— 


an 


U 


Rutland 


12 


— 


• 


. 


36 


U8 


















1 









1 

Salem 


BOSTON 
180 


FALL 

RIVER 


LAWRENCE 
i h 


SPRING- 
FIELD 


WORCESTER 


TOTAL 
181 


Salisbury 


Hi 


- 


5 


- 1 


- 


* 


Sandisfield 


- 


- 


- 


2 


— 


2 


Saugus 


kS 


- 


1 


- 


- 


' 16 


Savoy 


22 


- 


- 


- 


- 


22 


Scituate 


lib 


- 


- 


- 


- 


118 


Seekonk 


- 


5 


- 


- 


- 


5 


Sharon 


32 


- 


- 


- 


- 


32 


Sheffield 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


Sherborn 


3 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


Shrewsbury 


1 


- 


- 


- 


225 


226 


Somerset 


3 


126 


- 


- 


- 


129 


Somerville 


878 


- 


k 


~ 


- 


882 


South Hadley 


1 


- 


- 


50 


- 


51 


Southampton 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


Southborough 


2 J 


mm 


~ 


- 


1 


3 


Southbridge 


- 


- 


- 


3 


175 


178 


Scuthwick 


Km 


- 


- 


10 




10 


Spencer 


- 


- 


- 


- 


65 


65 


Springfield 


ko 


- 


- 


2U56 


- 


2U96 


Sterling 


1 


- 


- 


«..- ~ 


1 


2 


Stockbridge 


- 


- 


- 


8 


- 


8 


Stoneham 


ai 


- 


- 


- 


- 


ia 


Stoughton 


12U 


17 


~ 


- 


- 


iia 


Sturbridge 


2 


- 




12 


32 


U6 


Sudbury 


27 


- 


- 


- 


- 


27 


Sunderland 


1 


- 


- 


"" 


- 


1 


Sutton 


k 


- 


- 




3 


7 


Swamps cott 


kh 


- 


- 


- 


- 


hh 


Swansea 


- 


75 


- 


- 


„ 


75 


Taunton 


lit 


92 


5 


mm 




111 


Tewksbury 


13 


- 


U2 


- 


- 


55 


Tisbury 


1 




- 


- 


- 


1 


Topsfield 


h 


- 


1 


- 


- 


5 


Tyngsborough 


6 


- 


29 


- 


- 


35 


Upton 


. 




. 


_ 


19 


10 


Uxbridge 


2 


- 


- 


- 


30 


32 


Wakefield 


77 




16 




mm 


93 


Wales 


7 


- 


- 


- 


- 


7 


Walpole 


98 


— 


— 


- 


- 


98 


Waltham 


U26 


2 


10 


- 


- 


U38 


Ware 


2 


- 


- 


5 


53 


60 


warehara 


17 


13 


- 


- 


- 


30 


Warren 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Watertown 


Ubl 


- 


2 


- 


1 


U8U 


Wayland 


3Q 


— 


- 


- 


- 


30 


V.ebster 


7 


- 


- 


- 


165 


172 


•Jellesley 


71 


- 


- 


2 


- 


7 ? 


Wendell 


- 


— 


— 


k 


- 


" h 


Wenhham 


2 


— 


— 


- 


- 


2 


'■■'• Boylston 


- 


— 


- 


- 


53 


53 

















W. Bridgewater 
¥• BrookfieldJ 
Wi Springfield^ 

Westborough " 

Westfield 

Westford ' 



Westhampton_ 

Weston 

Westport 

Westwood 



Weymouth 

Whitman 

Wilbraham _ 
Wilmington^ 
Winchendon_ 
Winchester^ 
Winthrop __ 

Woburn 

Worcester 
Wrentham 



Yarmouth 



Out of State 



TOTAL 



BOSTON 



15* 



w 



fall 

RIVER 



LAWRENCE 



W 



"IF 



21 



W 
W 



T5" 



SPRING- 
FIELD 



WORCESTER 



Tg7 



TU 



117 



w 



"="T 



30 



93 



20 



11 



- ! 



37U 



25,l£l 



U,67U 



17U 



7,262 



hut 



U3 



h,±90 



10 



5,835 



TOTAL 



1 
T3 



"TIT 

123 



21 







20 



30 



23 



3o 



U7 

T6T 



31^9" 



601 



17,112 



***.. 



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